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Policing your neighbourhood

Solving local issues and being more visible and accessible in your community

  • Our Neighbourhood officers will be dedicated problem solvers, able to focus on dealing with local issues and being more visible and accessible within their communities.
  • Although there will be a small reduction in the number of Neighbourhood officers and staff, the hours they spend on community policing activities will not reduce.
  • This is because of the changes we are making in other areas. Neighbourhood officers will be dedicated to neighbourhood duties and they will not routinely be required to support other teams, such as Response and Investigation.
  • You’ve told us how much you value having a named local contact and this will continue.
  • Neighbourhood teams will work with partners and the community to provide solutions to persistent crime and anti-social behaviour issues that affect the quality of life for local people.
  • Our new model is also flexible, which means we can focus our resources to address issues of greatest community concern and in areas at higher risk of harm.

What does this mean for policing in local neighbourhoods?

We know Neighbourhood policing is hugely important to you, and that you want officers and staff to be visible and accessible in your community and to deal with the crime and anti-social behaviour that affects your local area.

Often, this means working with our partners, such as the local council, and the community to develop longer-term solutions. By giving our Neighbourhood officers more time to spend dealing with local issues, without having the day to-day responsibility of response and investigation, it means they can provide a better, more tailored service to local communities.

We will also have the flexibility to focus resources where they are most needed, to deal with a particular problem in a particular location and address the issues of greatest community harm.

We know you would also like officers to attend local meetings, such as those held by parish councils or residents’ associations. However, due to the vast number of such meetings across the county and the need for officers to focus on activities that help to reduce and prevent crime and anti-social behaviour, we will be attending fewer than we have previously.

We will make sure we provide regular local updates when we cannot attend, and will continue to work closely with the local community where there are policing issues that need resolving.

All communities will continue to have a named local contact and we will also be developing the unique role of the PCSO, building on their engagement skills so they can focus on community policing where the powers of a police officer are not necessary.

We will make sure there is continuity in local policing roles so police officers and PCSOs have the time to really get to know their neighbourhoods.

 

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