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Types of Hate Crime

Hate crimes and incidents are any crime or incident which is targeted at a victim because of the offender's hostility or prejudice against an identifiable group of people.

Racism

Any incident or crime which is perceived to be motivated because of a person's race, ethnicity or nationality - either their actual ethnicity or as perceived by the offender - will be recorded as such. Hate crimes can be committed against a person or property.

Religion and faith

Any incident or crime which is perceived to be motivated because of a person's faith or religion - either their actual faith/religion or faith/religion as perceived by the offender - will be recorded as such. Hate crimes can be committed against a person or property.

Sexual orientation

Homophobic Hate Crime is any incident or crime that is perceived by the victim, or any other person, to be motivated by a prejudice based on another person’s sexuality, or perceived sexuality. Domestic violence can also form part of homophobic crime, and may be carried out by partners, relatives, carers or friends.

Disability and Learning Disability/Difficulty

Any incident or crime, which is perceived by the victim or any other person to be motivated because of a person's disability or perceived disability will be recorded as such. This can be committed against a person or property.

The Equality Act 2010 (EA) generally defines a disabled person as someone who has a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

The EA includes special rules that ensure that people with HIV, cancer and multiple sclerosis are deemed to be disabled people effectively from the point of diagnosis, rather than from the point when the condition has some adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

The definition of disability hate crime would include anyone who was targeted as a result of his or her disability or impairment, as defined by the EA, including those diagnosed with HIV.

Gender Identity and Transgender Issues

The term transgender is used as an umbrella term to cover all those who identify as ‘trans’ – transsexual, transgender or transvestite.

Any incident or crime, which is perceived by the victim or any other person to be motivated because of a person's gender identity or perceived gender identity will be recorded as such. This can be committed against a person or property. If you are a victim of transphobia you should have the confidence to report the incident, without feeling embarrassed or that the police won’t take you seriously.

 

 

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